Baze University

Banking and Finance

About the course

This course draws on accounting, economics, investment theory, law and management to help you develop the skills needed for a successful career in banking or financial services.As well as hearing from industry representatives who will give presentations during your course. You'll learn to analyse financial markets, value and price financial instruments, financial markets and governments.The course will help you to develop a critical understanding of how organisations work, how they are managed, and how they interact with local, national and international environments.You'll also have the chance to further your experience with optional work placement modules. Our Placement and Employability Unit will help you find a suitable placement where you can build on your skills and knowledge, and will also encourage you to undertake extra-curricular activities such as volunteering, entering national business competitions and joining student societies.You will be considering a career in any area of banking and finance institution, or planning to develop your own business. Not only will you gain knowledge, you will also develop the skills to apply your knowledge to the analysis and solution of banking and finance problems.

What you will learn

The course aims:
The programme aims to provide students with a conceptual understanding of the core principles of banking and finance, its application to organisations and the ability to apply this knowledge to real issues facing businesses and other organisations.

Graduate destinations

Business
Banking
Finance
Banking And Finance
Economist

Course Details

Course Structure
Year 1 | Semester 1
Code: GEN103
Lecturer: Mercy Johnson
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

This module will introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study.

Aims:

To introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study at Baze University. Apart from learning the basic statistical tools useful for data collection, they will also gain valuable insight into number system, the concept of sets, laws of indices, solving equations and a wide range of other basic mathematical techniques. In essence, this module is designed to equip students with useful methods of solving and approaching mathematical problems.

Syllabus:

Introduction to Number System, Laws of Indices, General Inequality, Equation Systems, Algebra, Sequences and Series, Trigonometry as well as general overview of Statistics.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas and theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. 
  • Interactive lectures will review materials by encouraging their active participation - inviting questions, working through examples, giving short quizzes, discussing case studies, or showing a  video followed by a quiz, etc.
  • Classes: This will encourage students to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage them also to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas. Classes will usually require them to read some material(s) for discussion, or prepare answers, give some presentations, research a topic, take part in a debate, etc. 
  • Homework: Homework will be assigned regularly. Regular assignments will help them understand the material and they will get feedback.

Intended learning outcomes:

On the  successful completion of this module, students are expected to have developed their skills and have:

  • Ability to read and understand fundamental mathematics.
  • Ability to apply range of concepts in Mathematics or represent and solve problems in Mathematics.
  • Ability to represent and analyse data using the right techniques.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Basic College Mathematics by Elayn Matin-Gay, New Jersey, Pearson Prentice Hall.
  • College Mathematics for Business, Economics, Life Sciences & Social Sciences (11th Edition) by Raymond A. Bernet, Michael R, Ziegler, & Karl E. Byleen. New Jersey, Pearson Prence Hall.
  • Algebra & Trigonometry (Sixth Edition) by Michael Sullivan. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458.
  • Any other mathematical textbook that covers any of the topics.

Code: GEN110
Lecturer: Rislan Abdulazeez
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Computing for Academic Skills ,
Overview:

Academic Skills course is designed to give students the tools and skills that they need to get the most out of their undergraduate study at Baze. Thus, it is angled towards a range of areas and ideas. One such area is to improve your standard of English. Beyond that, it is also to prepare you to excel in professional and business settings.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to give the student the ability to acquire and use basic English Language skills and other personal and interpersonal skills which are required in academic, professional and business domains.

Syllabus:

Study skills and methods. Use of Library. Research skills. Reading skills. Units of Grammar---Morpheme I. Parts of Speech I. Parts of Speech II. Phrases and Clauses: types and functions. Sentences: types, structure, and functions. Tense and Mood. Concord and Meaning relations.

Teaching and learning methods:

Lectures will serve to explain the topics in the syllabus.

  • Class activity, interaction and discussion will serve to arouse individual participation, grow communication skills and self-expression.


Intended learning outcomes:

On completing this module the student should be able to:

  • Read and write well
  • Listen and speak properly
  • Think critically
  • Develop personal and interpersonal skills needed     
  •  in academic, professional and business settings.
  • Demonstrate proper understanding of referencing a work.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  1. Essential Academic Skills.(Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2011).
  2. Oxford Guide to Effective Writing &Speaking,2nd Edition,(Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005).


Code: GEN105
Lecturer: Rukayyatu Gurin
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: ACC101
Lecturer: Emeka E. Ene
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

A course that would provide basis for neophytes in accountancy profession.

Aims:

To provide students with basic understanding of accounting and financial reporting, introduce them to the concepts in IFRS and how to write up basic financial accounting records and books.

Syllabus:

This course is offered in first semester. It covers the following topics:
1. The Nature and Scope of Accounting: Origin and meaning of accounting. The Functions of Accountants. Accounting Functions and Its Relationship with the Information System of Organizations. Accounting Procedure and Systems.
2. Introduction to Conceptual framework for Financial Accounting. Accounting concepts and conventions including Double Entry Book-keeping Systems & Accruals. From GAAP to IFRS an introduction to IFRS.
3. Accounting process: From books of original entry to trial balance.
4. Bank reconciliation statement.
5. Introduction to correction of errors.
6. Introduction to control accounts & self-balancing ledgers.

Teaching and learning methods:

• Lectures will be used to explain the topics in the syllabus.
• Practical workshop comprising regular class tests and models answers will be emphasised
• Class discussion will also be used to stimulate individual participation and develop communication skills

Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Present the origin of modern day accounting, and differentiate between financial accounting and book-keeping.
• Discuss meaning of financial accounting, its content and quality, and users of its information.
• Discuss basic accounting concepts and conventions.
• Distinguish between GAAP and IFRS and related terminologies.
• Write up books of original entry, principal books of accounts and extract a trial balance.
• Prepare bank reconciliation statement.
• Understand basic principles underlying control accounts and self-balancing ledgers.
• Understand basic correction of errors and suspense account


Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 30%
Quiz: 1%
Coursework: 1%
Recommended reading list:

Ene, E. E. and Ejinwa U. J. (2014): Foundation in Accounting. 1st Edition. Abuja: Shollud Associates.
Frank W. and Alan S. (2012): Business Accounting 1. 12th Edition. London: Pearson Education Limited. (Note: an older edition can be used).
ICAN Study Pack: Foundation Stage
Igben R.O. (2014) Financial Accounting Made Simple (FAMS) Vol 1 4th Edition El-toda Ventures limited
Thomas, A. and Ward, A. M. (2015): Introduction to Financial Accounting, 8th edition, London: McGraw Hill Education. (Note: an older edition can be used).

Code: BUS101
Lecturer: Christiana Obonyilo
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

  • Understand the evolution of the business organization.
  • Discuss and compare different models and approaches to understanding the firm in the context of the business environment.

Aims:

The course aims to: 

  • Provide a comprehensive introduction to the key elements of the business organization.
  • Build a foundation of knowledge on the different theoretical approaches to business and decision making. 
  • Develop analytical skills to identify the links between the functional areas in business, organizations, management practices and the business environment.

Syllabus:

Types of Businesses and issues affecting business in Nigeria; Leadership, Founders and Climate; Marketing; Human Resource Management; Strategy; Organizational Planning; Supply Chain and Operations Management; and Financial Management.

Teaching and learning methods:

  • Lectures will be used to explain the topics in the syllabus. In some cases, appropriate video will be used to enhance students understanding.
  • Class discussion will be used to enhance individual participation and develop communication skills.

Intended learning outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to: 

  • Explore the impact of key environmental factors on decision making and organizational behavior.
  • Evaluate the significance of public policies in business and entrepreneurial activities.

Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 10%
Quiz: %
Coursework: 20%
Recommended reading list:

  • John T., and Courtland B.(2015), Business in Action 7th ed., Pearson Education, Essex.
  • Sandino, T. (2007). Introducing the First Management Control Systems: Evidence from the Retail Sector.  
  • Yukl, G., (1989). Managerial Leadership: A Review of Theory and Research. Journal of Management, Vol. 15.

Code: GEN107
Lecturer: James Daniel
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
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Code: GEN101
Lecturer: Andrew Bula
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

NIL

Aims:

NIL

Syllabus:

NIL

Teaching and learning methods:

NIL

Intended learning outcomes:

NIL

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

NIL

Year 1 | Semester 2
Code: GEN102
Lecturer: Mamman Aliyu
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: ACC102
Lecturer: Emeka E. Ene
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

A course that would provide further basis for neophytes in financial accounting

Aims: provide students with basic understanding of accounting and financial reporting, introduce them to further accounting related issues like bills of exchange transactions, expose them to basic final accounts of sole traders, manufacturing accounts, and accounts of clubs and societies, and incomplete records and single entries.
Syllabus:

This course is offered in second semester. It covers the following topics:
1. Bills of exchange
2. Final accounts of sole trader
3. End period adjustments in accounts
4. Manufacturing accounts
5. Correction of errors 2
6. Control accounts and self-balancing ledger 2
7. Classification of Expenditure between Capital and Revenue. Accounts of clubs and societies
8. Incomplete Records and Single entry

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures will be used to explain the topics in the syllabus.
  • Practical workshop comprising regular class tests and models answers will be emphasized
  • Class discussion will also be used to stimulate individual participation and develop communication skills

Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this course the student should be able to:

  • Discuss bills of exchange and write of the books of the drawer and drawee, and explain related transactions.
  • Prepare final accounts in GAAP and IFRS formats
  • Make adjustment entries in final accounts
  • Explain basic items in manufacturing accounts and prepare a manufacturing account.
  • Discuss the contents of accounts of clubs and societies and write up the relevant accounts

Explain incomplete record and single entry. Write up accounts with basic incomplete record issues

Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 30%
Quiz: 1%
Coursework: 1%
Recommended reading list:

Ene, E. E. and Ejinwa U. J. (2014): Foundation in Accounting. 1st Edition. Abuja: Shollud Associates.
Frank W. and Alan S. (2012): Business Accounting 1. 12th Edition. London: Pearson Education Limited. (Note: an older edition can be used).
ICAN Study Pack: Foundation Stage
Igben R.O. (2014) Financial Accounting Made Simple (FAMS) Vol. 1 4th Edition El-toda Ventures limited
Thomas, A. and Ward, A. M. (2015): Introduction to Financial Accounting, 8th edition, London: McGraw Hill Education. (Note: an older edition can be used).

Code: COM101
Lecturer: Rislan Abdulazeez
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: GEN108
Lecturer: Mercy Johnson
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: MTH102
Lecturer: Dr. Samson Bolarinwa Bolaji
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: GEN104
Lecturer: Omojuyigbe Abosede
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Use of English 1 ,
Overview:

In this module, students will learn to write well structured essays, overcome speech anxiety, work effectively in groups , the art of public speaking and give well structured presentations

Aims:

The aim of the module is to teach students the rudiments of public speaking, team work  and  presentations.

Syllabus:

Reading comprehension, Literary appreciation, Writing skills, Presentation skills, Working in groups for a presentation, Preparing for assessed presentation.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures will be given through power point presentations to explain the topics contained in the syllabus.
  • Class discussions will also be used to enhance individual participation, self confidence and team work as the students will be required to give presentations fortnightly


Intended learning outcomes:

Students who have taken this module should be able to:

  • Read effectively
  • Write well structured essays
  • Work effectively in a group or team
  • Carry out researches independently
  • Give good presentations


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Turner, Kathy et al., Essential Academic Skills,[ Oxford University Press,  Oxford ,2011]
  • Kathleen T. McWhorter,  Academic Reading,  [ HarperCollins College Publishers, 1994]
  • Seely, John, Oxford Guide to Effective Reading and Speaking, [ Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005]

Year 2 | Semester 1
Code: ACC203
Lecturer: Onyilo Francis
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: GEN203
Lecturer: Abdulmunin Saad
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: GEN201
Lecturer: Shulammite Paul
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: ACC201
Lecturer: Josephine C. Ene
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting & Reporting II ,
Overview:

The course builds on financial accounting foundation to broaden student’s perspective on basic issues in Financial Accounting and expose the uniqueness of the theory and practice of partnership accounting and specialized transactions.

Aims:

The course builds on financial accounting foundation to broaden student’s perspective on basic issues in Financial Accounting and expose the uniqueness of the theory and practice of partnership accounting and specialized transactions.

Syllabus:

Depreciation and Disposal of Non-Current Assets, Advanced Control accounts and incomplete records, Introduction to Partnership accounting, Departmental Account, Joint Venture Accounts, Consignment Accounts.

Teaching and learning methods:

  •         Lectures will be used to explain the topics in the syllabus.
  •         Practical workshop comprising regular class tests and models answers will be emphasized.
Class discussion will also be used to stimulate individual participation and develop communication skills

Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  •          Explain the concept of depreciation, its methods of calculation and accounting treatment.
  •          Explain the characteristics of a partnership including mutual agency and unlimited liability
  •          Prepare partnership’s profit or loss appropriation accounts and Capital accounts.
  •          Understand basic principles underlying the techniques required in accounting for specialized transactions.
Distinguish between miscellaneous accounts related terminologies.

Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 30%
Quiz: 1%
Coursework: 1%
Recommended reading list:

1.       Wood, F. and Alan S. (2012). Business Accounting 1 (12th ed.). London: Prentice Hall.

2.       Wood, F. and Alan S. (2012). Business Accounting 2 (12th ed.). London: Prentice Hall.

3.       Igben, O.R. (2014). Financial Accounting Made Simple Vol 1. EL-TODA Venture Limited.

4.       Soyede, A. (1983). Financial Accounting (Principles and Practice).London: Graham Burn F & A Publishers Ltd.

        5.  ICAN/ANAN Study Pack.

Code: BUS201
Lecturer: Solomon Peter
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Year 2 | Semester 2
Code: ACC204
Lecturer: Aliyu Ishaq Enesi
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: BUS202
Lecturer: Gado Nuhu
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: GEN202
Lecturer: Olalekan Sakariyau
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship Studies I ,
Overview:

Entrepreneurship II expands on the foundation to this subject which was laid during the module Entrepreneurship I. We examine in detail the entrepreneurial process and Steps in the process of assessing the viability of a new venture which will be illustrated and students will be expected to conduct such a study.

Aims:

The aim of this module is the creation of New Ventures, that is, the ways and means they come into being and the key factors associated with either their success or failure.

Syllabus:

Decision to become an entrepreneur, Developing successful business ideas, Moving from an Idea to an Entrepreneurial firm, Managing and growing an Entrepreneurial firm.

Teaching and learning methods:

The module employs lectures, videos, case discussions and analyses, student field work & presentations and general discussions to engage the student in the material.  Student involvement in class activities play a significant role in the learning process. 

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module student should be able to:

  • Understand the nature of the entrepreneurial process and ways to manage the process
  • Understand the difference between an opportunity and an idea, how to recognize it and how to evaluate it.
  • Describe the purpose of a feasibility analysis and develop a business model
  • Appreciate ethical issues that are intertwined with entrepreneurial activities and develop a framework for managing ethical dilemmas. 
  • Evaluate the nature of creative new business concepts that can be turned into sustainable business ventures.
Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 15%
Quiz: %
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

Bruce R. Barringer and Duane Ireland. Entrepreneurship- Successfully Launching New Ventures, 5th Ed., Pearson

Code: ACC202
Lecturer: Josephine C. Ene
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting & Reporting I ,
Overview:

The module examines accounting standards and their applications in various specialized businesses. The student will learn various terminologies used in specialized business and their distinctive processes of preparation and presentation of final accounts.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to critically expose the technicalities involved in accounting treatment of specialized businesses’ financial transactions.

Syllabus:

This course covers areas such as:
Royalty Accounts Container Accounts, Sinking Fund and Annuities, Insurance Accounts, Contract Accounts. Trustee, Estate Agencies, Farmers, Leasing, Hire Purchase, Solicitors, Underwriters, Unit Trust, Voyage, Cooperative Societies, Stock Brokerage, Pension funds and Property companies.

Teaching and learning methods: • Lectures will be used to explain the topics in the syllabus.
• Practical workshop comprising regular class tests
• Class discussion will also be used to stimulate individual participation.
Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Distinguish between Construction contract, Long term contract, Short term contract
• Prepare accounts relating to solicitors, provident funds, voyage/shipment and cooperative societies.
• Prepare the final accounts of Trustee, Estate Agencies, Farmers and solicitors etc.
• Understand the difference between Hire purchase, Finance lease and Operating lease
• Demonstrate the calculations and accounting treatment of Hire purchase and Leasing

 

Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 30%
Quiz: 1%
Coursework: 1%
Recommended reading list:

1.       Wood, F. and Alan S. (2012). Business Accounting 2 (12th ed.). London: Prentice Hall.

2.       Igben, O.R. (2014). Financial Accounting Made Simple Vol 2. EL-TODA Venture Limited.

      3.    ICAN/ANAN Study Pack

Year 3 | Semester 1
Code: GEN301
Lecturer: Obianuju Chidiebele Aliche
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: BUS301
Lecturer: Pauline Onyeukwu
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: BAF303
Lecturer: Professor Godwin Owoh
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: ACC307
Lecturer: Adamu Garba
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

Tax and tax administration remains a vital area in individual and business existence as well as national development given the role of taxation as a source of government revenue. In this course students will be taught different types of taxes as well as how they are calculated and presented. Students will also learn the taxation process and how tax is administered.

Aims:

The aim of this course is to teach students computation of tax and preparation tax statements for individuals and businesses.

Syllabus:

Nigerian System of Income Tax Administration: structure and procedures, returns, assessments, appeal, postponement, collection; with reference to all necessary legislations. Distinction between the taxation of income and the taxation of capital. Personal Income Tax: the law and practice of Income tax relating to individuals, exemptions, settlements, trusts, and estates. Partnership assessments, treatments of losses, computation of assessable income; commencement and cessation of trade or business. Company Tax – the principles and scope of Company Tax. The small company provisions including definitions, computations and exemptions.

Teaching and learning methods:

• Lectures and case studies will be used to explain concepts and theories.
• Class discussions and practice sessions will be used to consolidate students’ understanding and promote participation.

Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this module the student should be able to:
• itemize various types of taxes in Nigeria
• discuss tax administration and agencies responsible
• demonstrate understanding of different tax computations
• apply tax laws to individual and business income
• discuss problems of taxation in Nigeria

Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 30%
Quiz: 1%
Coursework: 1%
Recommended reading list:

1. Ejemeyovwi, I.A.K. (2015) Nigerian Taxation: Policy, Principles and Practice. Abuja: Dagya Concepts
2. Bassey, O.U (2013) Personal Income Tax in Nigeria. Lagos: CIBN Press
3. Bassey, O.U (2013) Companies Taxation in Nigeria. Lagos: CIBN Press

Code: BAF301
Lecturer: Onyilo Francis
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: For a modern economy to grow prosperously and sustainably, it needs a strong financial system which is an integral part of the economy. This module is designed to introduce students to the general role, function, structure, performance, and dynamics of the FMIs locally and internationally, which has great impact on the availability of business and governmental funding options and outcomes of diverse investment decision-making processes.
Aims: At the end of the course, students should have acquired the general knowledge, understanding, and ability to analyze the role, function, structure, and performance the money markets and capital markets in Nigeria and globally. Students will also be able to deepen their understanding of the changing role of market regulators in financial sector growth and development.
Syllabus:

Overview of capital allocation process, financial intermediation, and market efficiency; the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), NDIC, NSIA, PENCOM, etc; investment banks and commercial banks; DFIs and investment companies, microfinance & mortgage finance institutions, money markets, capital markets; international financial institutions global financial crises, role of technologies and marketing issues.

Teaching and learning methods:

Lectures will be used to expose the students to major concepts and theoretical basis of the financial system and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. Also, there will be participative class sessions, workshops, and self-directed /group projects to enrich students’ learning experience. 

Intended learning outcomes:

Ability to collect, organize, present data on FMIs in Nigeria and to make intelligent inferences for finance and investment decision-making as well as for policy analysis. Students should also be able to question common institutional practices and identify contemporary issues.

Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 15%
Quiz: %
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

Financial Institutions Hand book by Jide Olakanmi & Co, 3rd Edition, (2012). Abuja: LawLords Publications.

Financial Management: Concepts, Financial system, and Business Finance by R. A. Olowe (2011).Lagos: Brierly Jones Nigeria Limited. 

Year 3 | Semester 2
Code: GEN300
Lecturer: No Name
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Year 4 | Semester 1
Code: BUS403
Lecturer: Bernard Verr
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: NIL
Aims: NIL
Syllabus: NIL
Teaching and learning methods: NIL
Intended learning outcomes: NIL
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list: NIL
Code: PRO401
Lecturer: Ibrahim Muhammad
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
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Recommended reading list:
Year 4 | Semester 2
Code: PRO401
Lecturer: Ibrahim Muhammad
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
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Entry requirements

Home / UTME


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
JAMB;

Home / Direct Entry


A level / Diploma / IJMB / HND / First degree;
JAMB DE Form;
SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

Home / Direct Transfer


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
Academic transcript;
Please note: Admission on transfer will only be issued after on campus interview;

Foundation


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

International (Nigerian)


O' level result;
JAMB;
Please note: You can get a conditional admission if you does not have JAMB, but you must provide it before you progress to 200 level;

International (Foreign)


O' level result;

Staff

There are no staff for this course