Baze University

Electrical/Electronics

About the course

Electrical and electronic engineers develop systems that power our homes and enable us to communicate wherever we are. From smartphones and agile robots, to aircraft control systems and renewable energy provision, the solutions developed by electrical and electronic engineers continue to improve and transform our lives.

What you will learn

The course aims:

The work carried out on this course will provide the demonstrable expertise necessary to help secure professional level employment in related industries.

The topic areas also provide opportunities for interaction with the Faculty’s Research Centres who will source some of the individual projects for the programme.

The BSc in Electrical and Electronic Engineering curriculum consists of a fixed menu of study and a substantial project. Successful completion of all elements leads to the award of BSc in Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Graduate destinations

Electrical Computer
Computer Engineer
Aerospace Engineer
Broadcast Engineer
Control And Instrumentation Engineer
Electrical Engineer
Electronics Engineer
IT Consultant
Network Engineer
Nuclear Engineer
Systems Analystr

Course Details

Course Structure
Year 1 | Semester 1
Code: GEN103
Lecturer: Mercy Johnson
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

This module will introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study.

Aims:

To introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study at Baze University. Apart from learning the basic statistical tools useful for data collection, they will also gain valuable insight into number system, the concept of sets, laws of indices, solving equations and a wide range of other basic mathematical techniques. In essence, this module is designed to equip students with useful methods of solving and approaching mathematical problems.

Syllabus:

Introduction to Number System, Laws of Indices, General Inequality, Equation Systems, Algebra, Sequences and Series, Trigonometry as well as general overview of Statistics.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas and theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. 
  • Interactive lectures will review materials by encouraging their active participation - inviting questions, working through examples, giving short quizzes, discussing case studies, or showing a  video followed by a quiz, etc.
  • Classes: This will encourage students to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage them also to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas. Classes will usually require them to read some material(s) for discussion, or prepare answers, give some presentations, research a topic, take part in a debate, etc. 
  • Homework: Homework will be assigned regularly. Regular assignments will help them understand the material and they will get feedback.

Intended learning outcomes:

On the  successful completion of this module, students are expected to have developed their skills and have:

  • Ability to read and understand fundamental mathematics.
  • Ability to apply range of concepts in Mathematics or represent and solve problems in Mathematics.
  • Ability to represent and analyse data using the right techniques.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Basic College Mathematics by Elayn Matin-Gay, New Jersey, Pearson Prentice Hall.
  • College Mathematics for Business, Economics, Life Sciences & Social Sciences (11th Edition) by Raymond A. Bernet, Michael R, Ziegler, & Karl E. Byleen. New Jersey, Pearson Prence Hall.
  • Algebra & Trigonometry (Sixth Edition) by Michael Sullivan. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458.
  • Any other mathematical textbook that covers any of the topics.

Code: CHM101
Lecturer: Jibrin Noah Akoji
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
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Code: PHY107
Lecturer: Babangida Babaji Abdullahi
Unit: 1
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

General Physics 1 practical is the laboratory section that cover all the topics taught in General Physics 1 (PHY101).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of all the topics (mechanics, heat and optics)

Syllabus:

The experiments include: Mechanics: timing experiments, simple pendulum, compound pendulum, measurement of g, moments, determination of moment of inertia, measurement of viscosity, use of force board, law of momentum. Optics: reflection using plane mirror, convex/concave mirror, concave/convex lens, refraction using a prism, critical angle, apparent depth/real depth, simple microscope, compound microscope.Heat: measurement of specific heat capacity of water and a solid, expansion of gas experiment using a long capillary tube, Joule’s law.

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in PHY101 class.Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: COM112
Lecturer: Mrs Lawrence Morolake Oladayo
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: NIL
Aims: NIL
Syllabus: NIL
Teaching and learning methods: NIL
Intended learning outcomes: NIL
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list: NIL
Code: GEN107
Lecturer: James Daniel
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
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Code: MTH102
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
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Code: PHY101
Lecturer: Hamman Gabdo
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: General overview of the module, module description and students - instructor introduction.
Aims: To aid students to understand the broad-based fundamental principles of the physical world. This module will on the practical applications of everyday experience and industrial processes. 
Syllabus:
  • Measurement in physical world
  • One dimensional kinematics - distance, displacement, speed, velocity, acceleration, uniform, motion, free fall.
  • Vector and scalar - vector addition, subtraction, division, multiplication and applications.
  • Problem solving section.
  • Two-dimensional kinematics - position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and projectile.
  • Fundamental laws of Mechanics.
  • Problem solving and mid-term exam
  • Work, energy and power.
  • Temperature and heat.
  • Introduction to thermodynamics.
  • Hydrostatics.
  • Problem solving.
  • Elasticity.
  • Problem solving
Teaching and learning methods: Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concepts of the fundamentals to students. The theories (equations) and their applications will be illustrated in this section.

Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student - instructor interactions. The instructor and students ask more questions and solve more examples.

Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will encourage you (students) to begin to gain confidence in solving difficult problems. The students are required to prepare any difficult problems they are unable to solve on their own for discussion.

Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students' answers to class-work and homework should be clear, concise and correct. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work.
Intended learning outcomes: Students are expected to develop the necessary skills required to solve fundamental problems in physics. This will enable them prepare for further studies in respective field.
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 25%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 10%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 (8th Ed.) Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol 1 (13th Ed.) Addison - Wesley
Code: GEN101
Lecturer: Andrew Bula
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

NIL

Aims:

NIL

Syllabus:

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Teaching and learning methods:

NIL

Intended learning outcomes:

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Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

NIL

Year 1 | Semester 2
Code: CHM102
Lecturer: Abubakar Alkali
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: NIL
Aims: NIL
Syllabus: NIL
Teaching and learning methods: NIL
Intended learning outcomes: NIL
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list: NIL
Code: PHY108
Lecturer: Babangida Babaji Abdullahi
Unit: 1
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

General Physics 2 practical is the laboratory section that cover all the topics taught in General Physics 2 (PHY102).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of all the topics (Electricity, magnetism, vibration and waves)

Syllabus:

Electricity: Ohm’s law, heating effect of a current, internal resistance of a cell, meter/Wheatstone Bridge, potentiometer measurement of ece, plotting of magnetic field. Sound: resonance tube, sonometer.

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in PHY101 class.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: GEN108
Lecturer: Mercy Johnson
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
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Quiz: %
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Code: MTH201
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
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Assessment:
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Code: MTH103
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
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Code: PHY102
Lecturer: Joseph Asare
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Physics 1 ,
Overview:

The subject of electromagnetism is a combination of electrostatics phenomena, magnetism, and current electricity. These must have seemed at one time to be entirely different phenomena until in 1829 when Oersted discovered that an electric current is surrounded by a magnetic field. The basic phenomena and the connections between these three disciplines were ultimately described by Maxwell towards the end of the nineteenth century in four famous equations called the Maxwell's Equations. The course acquaints the student with concepts of electric and magnetic fields associated with particles and how these are affected in the presence of other particles.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to aid students in understanding the broad-based fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism by emphasizing on applications associated to industrial processes and everyday experiences.

Syllabus:

Electrostatics.

Conductors and Currents.

Magnetism.

Maxwell's Equations.

Electromagnetic Waves and Oscillations.

Teaching and learning methods:

  • Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concept of the fundamentals to students.
  • Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student-instructor interactions.
  • Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will build confidence in students and encourage participation in problem solving.
  • Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students will received feedback on the homework and class-work for improvement.

Intended learning outcomes:

The theories and their applications illustrated in this module should expose students to the required foundational knowledge in Electromagnetism required for higher education in the department. 

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 20%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

  1. Young, H. D., & Freedman, R. A. (2015). University Physics with Modern Physics and Mastering Physics. Academic Imports Sweden AB.
  2. Serway, R. A., Beichner, R. J., & Jewett, J. W. (2000). Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics.
  3. Paul E. Tippens. (2007). Electricity and Magnetism Lecture Notes. Southern Polytechnic State University.
  4. Lisa Jardine-Wright. (2008). Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism. Cavendish Labrotory.

Code: GEN104
Lecturer: Omojuyigbe Abosede
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Use of English 1 ,
Overview:

In this module, students will learn to write well structured essays, overcome speech anxiety, work effectively in groups , the art of public speaking and give well structured presentations

Aims:

The aim of the module is to teach students the rudiments of public speaking, team work  and  presentations.

Syllabus:

Reading comprehension, Literary appreciation, Writing skills, Presentation skills, Working in groups for a presentation, Preparing for assessed presentation.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures will be given through power point presentations to explain the topics contained in the syllabus.
  • Class discussions will also be used to enhance individual participation, self confidence and team work as the students will be required to give presentations fortnightly


Intended learning outcomes:

Students who have taken this module should be able to:

  • Read effectively
  • Write well structured essays
  • Work effectively in a group or team
  • Carry out researches independently
  • Give good presentations


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Turner, Kathy et al., Essential Academic Skills,[ Oxford University Press,  Oxford ,2011]
  • Kathleen T. McWhorter,  Academic Reading,  [ HarperCollins College Publishers, 1994]
  • Seely, John, Oxford Guide to Effective Reading and Speaking, [ Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005]

Year 2 | Semester 1
Code: GEC203
Lecturer: Akinwande Alonge
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: Applied mechanics is the branch of science which deals study of effect of   forces on body when body is in rest or in motion.

There are two branches of applied mechanics covered, namely:
  • Statics.
  • Dynamics

Aims:
This course covers two important topics statics and dynamics in statics we study the effect of forces bodies at rest;
  • In dynamics we study  the effect of forces while body is in motion
  • In statics we study the analysis of force members like trusses analysis bridges equilibrium of bodies etc.
  • In dynamics study of projectiles , motion under gravity and motion of rotation etc.
Syllabus:
  • Force and force system.
  • Laws of forces (static laws).
  • Force system and their properties. Introduction to friction
  • Particle dynamics – Kinematics of plane motion.
  • Kinetics of particles, momentum and energy methods.
  • Kinematics of rigid body – velocity and acceleration.
  • Kinetics of rigid bodies.
  • Introduction to simple harmonic motion.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas, theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. 
  • Classes: Classes will encourage you to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage students to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas.

Intended learning outcomes: At the end of the module the students will:
  • Solve basic problems of statics and dynamics
  • Analysis of trusses finding the C.G of different bodies and moment of inertia of bodies which is is used in designing of machines.
  • Application basic principles and  laws applied mechanics to  real life applications..
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Ferdinand P beer and ERussell Johnson Jr Fourth edition.
  • H.C Hiebbler. Tenth Edition
  • R.K.Rajaput. Sixth Edition

Code: gec211
Lecturer: Iranna M Biradar
Unit: 2
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

  • Engineering drawing is language of engineers, through sketches sizes and shapes of components are communicated.
  •  In engineering drawing we study mainly three important topics:
  • Orthographic projection.
  • Development of surfaces
  • Isometric projection.


Aims:
This course helps to create technical drawings which is used in industries for manufacture of various components;
It also helps  students to  develop the lateral surfaces of ; 
Furthermore, for manufacture to get overall idea of component three dimensional object can be created with isometric view or isomeric projection.

Syllabus:

Introduction to drawing instruments. lettering, dimensioning Drawing sheet layout.

Engineering graphics – Geometrical figures, comics, etc.  Graphical calculus and Applications tc.

Introduction to Projection of points.

Introduction to Projection of straight lines.

Introduction to Projection of Plane figures. 

Introduction to Projection of solids.

Development of surfaces and isometric projection

Pictoral/Freehand Sketching.

Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting


Teaching and learning methods:

Lectures: Lectures will be used  and 3d models are used while projection of solids and 2d figures  are used in projection of plane figures

Classes: Classes will encourage you to begin to apply the knowledge gained to  projection real life application like connecting rod  TR module etc.


Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module the students will:

Solve the projection of point problems.

Solve the projection of plane figures.

Apply the knowledge of development of surfaces in industries like pressure vessels chimneys etc


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

Engineering Drawing by N.D. Bhatta.

Engineering Drawing by Basanth Agarwal. Tata Mcgraw Hill 

Engineering Drawing by Professor P.J. Shah


Code: mth211
Lecturer: Mahboob Zakariya
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
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Code: gec209
Lecturer: Ahmed Baba-ahmed
Unit: 2
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

Philosophy, History, Role and Regulation of Engineering and Technology in Society. Safety, risk assessment and ethics in Engineering.

Aims:

To acquaint the students with the knowledge of the relevance of the different Engineering disciplines in the society and equip them with the understanding of ways to safely, effectively, efficiently and ethically carry out the responsibilities of an Engineer.

Syllabus: Philosophy of Science and Engineering.
History of Engineering and Technology.
Safety in Engineering and introduction to risk analysis.
Engineers' code of conduct and ethics.
The Engineering professional and literacy bodies, engineering societies.
Engineers and nation building - economy, politics, business.                             
Invited lecturers from professionals.

Teaching and learning methods:

Lectures, Class discussions, Assignments and Group Projects

Intended learning outcomes: On completion of this module, the student should be able to:           
  • Understand the role played by Engineering in shaping the society of today.
  • Understand the important of safety and ethics in Engineering and be equipped with required tools to carry out risk assessment in any Engineering endeavors
       

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Bahr J.N (2014) System Safety Engineering and Risk Assessment. A Practical Approach (2nd Ed.) CRC Press
  • Fleddermann C. B (2012) Engineering Ethics. 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey.                                                                            
  • Goddard .J. (2009) National Geographic Concise History of Science and Invention: An Illustrated Time Line.
  • Bunch B and Hellemans A (2004) The History of Science and Technology: A Browser's Guide to the Great Discoveries, Inventions, and the People Who Madethem from the Dawn of Time to Today, First Edition, Scientific Publishing. New York                                                                                                                               
Code: GEN201
Lecturer: Shulammite Paul
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
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Code: GEC201
Lecturer: Ahmed Baba-ahmed
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
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Code: gec207
Lecturer: Nuradeen Labaran Tanko
Unit: 2
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
  • This course covers the properties of fluids, viscosity, dimensions, pressure measurement;
  • It also introduces students to law of conservation laws; energy and momentum and their application; flow measurement;
  • Furthermore, flow in pipes, pipeline systems; hydro-static force on plane and curved submerged surfaces; buoyancy and stability of floating bodies are introduced.

Aims:
  • Apply & solve basic problems of fluid dynamics and statics
  • Apply & solve basic problems of the fundamental principles of fluid flow.
  • Apply basic principles and measurement of fluid flow in pipe flow.

Syllabus:
  • Fluid and its properties.
  • Elements of fluid statics 
  • Hydrostatic force on plane and curved submerged surfaces; buoyancy and stability of floating bodies.
  • Introduction to fluid dynamics.
  • Laminar and turbulent flows in ducts and pipes. 
  • Introduction to viscous flow.
  • Measurement of fluid flow.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas, theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications.  
  • Classes: Classes will encourage you to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage students to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas.

Intended learning outcomes:
  • At the end of the module the students will:
  • Solve basic problems of fluid dynamics and statics.
  • Solve basic problems of the fundamental principles of fluid flow.
  • Apply basic principles and measurement of fluid flow in pipe flow.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: %
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Coulson, J.M., & Richardson, J.F., 1999. Chemical Engineering Volume 1 (6th Edition), Butterworth-Heinemann, 1999.
  • Mott, R., 2006. Applied Fluid Mechanics, Prentice Hall Singapore.
  • Massey, B., 1998. Mechanics of Fluids. John Ward-Smith Stanley Thornes Ltd.

Code: gec205
Lecturer: Hezekiah Ogo Agogo Phd
Unit: 2
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

   • Engineering Thermodynamics deals with the interaction between heat energy and work done by engineering systems. Energy transfer between interacting systems. Student will also understand the various forms in which energy transfer will occur.

Aims:

  • This module will provide understanding to the concept of heat and energy transfer that result in a system doing work.

  • The students will understand the effect and contribution of heat generation, accumulation and losses in mechanical systems in the process of doing work.

  • The concept of heat and mass transfer with respect to engineering systems will be adequately explained.


Syllabus:

 • Dimensions and Units, Energy Conversions.

Laws of Thermodynamics and their applications.

Heat Generation and transfer

Entropy in Thermodynamics 

Power cycles and Two phase Media 

Engine Cycles


Teaching and learning methods:


 Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas, theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications.  

Classes: Classes will encourage you to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage students to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas.


Intended learning outcomes:


          At the end of the module the students will:

Understand the principles associated with energy and heat transfer. 

How energy transfer is converted to work done in numerous engineering systems 


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:


1. Perry\'s Chemical Engineers\' Handbook, Eighth Edition 8th Edition. by Don Green (Author), Robert Perry (Author).

2. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Book by Frank P. Incropera

3. Engineering Thermodynamics, Tarik Al Shemmeri

4. George A Duckett, Thermodynamics: Questions and Answers Jun 1, 2016 by George A Duckett.

5. Fundamentals of Thermodynamics, 2012. by Claus Borgnakke and Richard E. Sonntag.

6. Coulson and Richardson\'s Chemical Engineering by Jack Richardson, Series 1-6


Year 2 | Semester 2
Code: GEN301
Lecturer: Obianuju Chidiebele Aliche
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
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Code: GEC210
Lecturer: Fatima Ilyasu Balarabe
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of Electrical Engineering.

Aims:

To aid students understand the basic principles of electrical engineering.


Syllabus:

Circuits – elements, DC and AC circuits, Basic circuit laws and theorems.  Resonance, power, power factors, 3-phase circuits; AC machines and DC machines; Physics of devices – Discharge devices, semi-conductors, diode and transistors; Transistor characteristics, devices and circuits; Electrical and electrical power measurements.

Teaching and learning methods:

  • Lectures will be used to explain the topics in the syllabus. In some cases, appropriate video will be used to enhance students understanding 
  • Class discussion will be used to enhance individual participation and develop communication skills


Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this module the student should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of electrical engineering.
  • Understand the operations of electrical machines
  • Understand the concepts of electrical measurements.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Principles and Applications of Electrical Engineering (6th International Edition); Rizzoni, Giorgio; Kearns, James, Published by U.S.A.: McGraw-Hill, 2015.
  • Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering and Electronics; B. L. Theraja, S. Chand Limited, 1 Jun 2006.  
  • Electrical Engineering: Principles & Applications (6th Edition), Allan R. Humbly, Pearson; January 2013.

Code: GEC202
Lecturer: Olayemi Olaniyi
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
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Code: GEN203
Lecturer: Muktar Imam
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
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Code: MTH212
Lecturer: Auwal Shehu
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
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Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
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Test: %
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Code: GEC208
Lecturer: Ahmed Baba-ahmed
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
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Code: GEC206
Lecturer: Aliyu Bello
Unit: 2
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: Strength of Materials is the branch of Mechanics that studies the mechanics of deformable bodies.  It is also called as mechanics of materials.
In the course strength of materials students will learn idea of stresses and strains analysis of stresses and strains
  • Drawing of shear force and bending moment diagrams.
  • Torsion of shafts beams and columns etc.

Aims:
This course covers mainly introduction to stresses strains young’s modulus and compound stresses.
  • It also introduces students to draw the Mohr’s circle shear force and bending moment diagrams.
  • Furthermore, this course helps to students the study of torsion of shafts deflection of beams.
  • Finally this course helps knowledge of theories of failure.
Syllabus:
  • Equilibrium of forces – free body diagrams
  • Simple Stresses and Strains. Concept of stress, strain;
  • Tensile test.  Young’s moduli and other strength factors.
  • Axially loaded bars, composite bars,
  • Analysis of Stress and Strain.
  • Thick and thin cylinders
  • Hoop stresses in cylinders and rings
  • Shear Forces and Bending Moments
  • Stress in Beams
  • Torsion,  Columns and Strain Energy
Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas, theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. 
  • Classes: Classes will encourage you to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage students to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas.
Intended learning outcomes: At the end of the module the students will:
  • Solve basic problems of stress analysis and strain analysis.
  • Solve basic problems of   shear force and bending moment diagrams. Also students will learn torsion beam deflection and buckling of columns.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Strength of Materials by Stephen  Timoshenko Third edition
  • Mechanics of Materials by James.M.Gere. Sixth Edition
  • Mechanics of materials Frdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston Jr. (r), John T. DeWolf  David F. Mazurek  Seventh edition

Code: GEC218
Lecturer: Sunday Kanshio
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
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Recommended reading list:
Code: GEC212
Lecturer: Fatai Anafi
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

Work shop practice lab helps to carry out some basic operations like cutting of metal filing of metals fitting of metals etc  . 

There are four topics covered namely:

Fitting jobs.

Welding jobs

Development jobs

Introduction to carpentry section

Aims:

This course covers the basic operations of workshop;

It also introduces students to operation of welding machines; 

Furthermore it also helps students to develop the different objects which is essential in shipbuilding automobile industries.

It also helps to understand forging operations.

It introduces carpentry section also.


Syllabus:

Elementary introduction to types and organisation of  engineering  Workshop, covering jobbing, batch, mass  production

Engineering materials: their uses and properties.

 Safety in workshop and general principles of working

Fitting jobs.

Welding jobs.

Carpentry jobs.

Blacksmith: Hand tools and working principles.  

Sheet Metal works.

Introduction to forging operations.

Standard measuring tools used in workshop: Welding, brazing and soldering: Principles, classification, power


Teaching and learning methods:

Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas, and hand tools are used to illustrate their wide-ranging applications.  

Classes: Classes will encourage you to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real life cases and will encourage students to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas.


Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module the students will:

Fitting jobs like cutting filing making right angles etc.

Also learn welding jobs.

Development of surfaces jobs.

Carpentry jobs.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

Production technology by O.P Khanna

Production technology S.K.Hazra and Choudhry

Workshop Practice Manual by R .K.Hegde  Niranjan Murthy

Year 3 | Semester 1
Code: GEC301
Lecturer: Akinwande Alonge
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
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Recommended reading list:
Year 3 | Semester 2
Code: GEC302
Lecturer: Akinwande Alonge
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: GEC304
Lecturer: Sunday Kanshio
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Year 4 | Semester 1
Code: GEN202
Lecturer: Olalekan Sakariyau
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship Studies I ,
Overview:

Entrepreneurship II expands on the foundation to this subject which was laid during the module Entrepreneurship I. We examine in detail the entrepreneurial process and Steps in the process of assessing the viability of a new venture which will be illustrated and students will be expected to conduct such a study.

Aims:

The aim of this module is the creation of New Ventures, that is, the ways and means they come into being and the key factors associated with either their success or failure.

Syllabus:

Decision to become an entrepreneur, Developing successful business ideas, Moving from an Idea to an Entrepreneurial firm, Managing and growing an Entrepreneurial firm.

Teaching and learning methods:

The module employs lectures, videos, case discussions and analyses, student field work & presentations and general discussions to engage the student in the material.  Student involvement in class activities play a significant role in the learning process. 

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module student should be able to:

  • Understand the nature of the entrepreneurial process and ways to manage the process
  • Understand the difference between an opportunity and an idea, how to recognize it and how to evaluate it.
  • Describe the purpose of a feasibility analysis and develop a business model
  • Appreciate ethical issues that are intertwined with entrepreneurial activities and develop a framework for managing ethical dilemmas. 
  • Evaluate the nature of creative new business concepts that can be turned into sustainable business ventures.
Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 15%
Quiz: %
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

Bruce R. Barringer and Duane Ireland. Entrepreneurship- Successfully Launching New Ventures, 5th Ed., Pearson

Entry requirements

Home / UTME


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
JAMB;

Home / Direct Entry


A level / Diploma / IJMB / HND / First degree;
JAMB DE Form;
SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

Home / Direct Transfer


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
Academic transcript;
Please note: Admission on transfer will only be issued after on campus interview;

Foundation


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

International (Nigerian)


O' level result;
JAMB;
Please note: You can get a conditional admission if you does not have JAMB, but you must provide it before you progress to 200 level;

International (Foreign)


O' level result;

Staff

S/N Staff Name Rank
1 MAHBOOB ZAKARIYA Lecturer II
2 STEVE ADESHINA Associate Professor
3 YUSUF ABDULLAHI Lecturer II
4 YUSUF ABDULRAHMAN SAMBO Lecturer I