Baze University

Architecture

Introduction

The Department of Architecture, BAZE University was established in January 2017 with 8 pioneer students. Currently there are almost 100 students in various stages, 10 members of staff that were trained in Nigeria and abroad, and more importantly these are qualified academically and professionally in diverse fields of architecture.

About the Programme
Architecture is a world of creativity, a world of possibility, a world of innovation and solutions; Architecture is a special course with unique peculiarities. Architecture course is basically a hands-on programme that requires a lot more learning and working hours than most of the courses in the University. The learning curve is aimed at giving the students the best mentoring and guidance as they work through their designs
The Department’s aim is to train students for a five-year period leading to the Bachelor of Science (Architecture). Successful students are envisaged to directly proceed to the 18 months’ programme, leading to the professional degree of Master of Science (Architecture). The Department’s unwritten philosophy is the belief of, and emphasis on, the realisation of the Vitruvian triad within the Nigerian socio-cultural context.

The objectives of the programme include:
• The provision of state-of-the-art facilities to support learning.
• Availability of Academics and Professionals in the field of Architecture to lecture and support the students through their journey.
• Inculcating in each student, a good balance between theoretical and practical knowledge of the field.
• Annual introduction of the students to registration bodies, thereby creating a smooth transition from school to practice.

Environmental Relevance of the Programme
Architecture is essentially environmental. The environment forms the context for architecture and at the same time it also encompasses architecture. Architecture shapes the environment, just as it is shaped by the environment.
At BAZE University, the relevance of the architectural programme is taken to be self-evident, since for most people the question where one is coming from in the morning or where one is headed in the evening, is almost invariably, home. An old study estimated that on average human beings spend not less than 60% of their time indoors; at home, in places of work or at leisure. Even outdoors, the architect is still concerned with the environment, at micro level (Site Planning & landscape Architecture), and macro level (Sustainability, Urban Design and Urban Renewal)

Destinations of Graduands

The two qualifications necessary for the profession are in sync with the professional requirements of the Architects Registration Council of Nigeria (ARCON). Thus, students who so qualify are exempted from the ARCON Finals One and Two; successful graduates of BAZE University Architecture programme are immediately eligible for the ARCON professional examination after the mandatory two-year probation period.
Thus, the Architecture programme at BAZE is strongly affiliated with other courses in the University, in particular those that deal with the environment such as Structural Engineering, Building, Quantity Surveying, Estate Management and Urban & Regional Planning. There is mutual symbiosis between Architecture and these Departments in terms of course servicing, seminars and collaborations.
Successful graduates will claim their niche in practice, administration, academia, industry and even the military. According to the Nigerian Institute of Architects there are approximately 5,000 qualified architects in the country, meaning one architect is to serve the needs of 40,000 Nigerians. This is grossly inadequate when compared with developed worlds’ ratio of 1: 10,000.
At BAZE University, the hope and aim is to establish a reputation for excellence, innovation, hard-work and professional integrity.
Related Programmes (within the Faculty or University)
The Environment in its entirety is the domain of Architecture. Thus, it is not surprising to see the study of architecture in close association with other disciplines that are as varied as necessary. Students of architecture come into contact with so many disciplines that are as exciting as they are exacting. The architect at one time or another has something to do with Engineering (Structural, Electrical, Mechanical, Soil Mechanics, Hydrology etc.), History, Surveying, Urban & Regional Planning, Construction, Contract Law, Public Health, Sociology, Psychology, Ecology, Management, Research etc. 
Meanwhile, the specific closely related courses at BAZE University include:
• B. Sc. Building
• B. Sc. Estate Management
• B. Sc. Quantity Surveying
• B. Sc. Surveying and Geoinformatics
• B. Sc. Urban and Regional Planning
 
A.A.Muhammad-Oumar (PhD)
Head of Department

Course Details

Course Structure
Year 1 | Semester 1
Code: GEN103
Lecturer: Johnson Mercy
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

This module will introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study.

Aims:

To introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study at Baze University. Apart from learning the basic statistical tools useful for data collection, they will also gain valuable insight into number system, the concept of sets, laws of indices, solving equations and a wide range of other basic mathematical techniques. In essence, this module is designed to equip students with useful methods of solving and approaching mathematical problems.

Syllabus:

Introduction to Number System, Laws of Indices, General Inequality, Equation Systems, Algebra, Sequences and Series, Trigonometry as well as general overview of Statistics.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas and theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. 
  • Interactive lectures will review materials by encouraging their active participation - inviting questions, working through examples, giving short quizzes, discussing case studies, or showing a  video followed by a quiz, etc.
  • Classes: This will encourage students to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage them also to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas. Classes will usually require them to read some material(s) for discussion, or prepare answers, give some presentations, research a topic, take part in a debate, etc. 
  • Homework: Homework will be assigned regularly. Regular assignments will help them understand the material and they will get feedback.

Intended learning outcomes:

On the  successful completion of this module, students are expected to have developed their skills and have:

  • Ability to read and understand fundamental mathematics.
  • Ability to apply range of concepts in Mathematics or represent and solve problems in Mathematics.
  • Ability to represent and analyse data using the right techniques.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Basic College Mathematics by Elayn Matin-Gay, New Jersey, Pearson Prentice Hall.
  • College Mathematics for Business, Economics, Life Sciences & Social Sciences (11th Edition) by Raymond A. Bernet, Michael R, Ziegler, & Karl E. Byleen. New Jersey, Pearson Prence Hall.
  • Algebra & Trigonometry (Sixth Edition) by Michael Sullivan. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458.
  • Any other mathematical textbook that covers any of the topics.

Code: PHY107
Lecturer: Abdullahi Babangida Babaji
Unit: 1
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

General Physics 1 practical is the laboratory section that cover all the topics taught in General Physics 1 (PHY101).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of all the topics (mechanics, heat and optics)

Syllabus:

The experiments include: Mechanics: timing experiments, simple pendulum, compound pendulum, measurement of g, moments, determination of moment of inertia, measurement of viscosity, use of force board, law of momentum. Optics: reflection using plane mirror, convex/concave mirror, concave/convex lens, refraction using a prism, critical angle, apparent depth/real depth, simple microscope, compound microscope.Heat: measurement of specific heat capacity of water and a solid, expansion of gas experiment using a long capillary tube, Joule’s law.

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in PHY101 class.Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: GEN105
Lecturer: Rukayyatu Abdulkareem Gurin
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: COM112
Lecturer: Chollette Chiazor Olisah
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: NIL
Aims: NIL
Syllabus: NIL
Teaching and learning methods: NIL
Intended learning outcomes: NIL
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list: NIL
Code: PHY101
Lecturer: Nuhu Yunusa
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: General overview of the module, module description and students - instructor introduction.
Aims: To aid students to understand the broad-based fundamental principles of the physical world. This module will on the practical applications of everyday experience and industrial processes. 
Syllabus:
  • Measurement in physical world
  • One dimensional kinematics - distance, displacement, speed, velocity, acceleration, uniform, motion, free fall.
  • Vector and scalar - vector addition, subtraction, division, multiplication and applications.
  • Problem solving section.
  • Two-dimensional kinematics - position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and projectile.
  • Fundamental laws of Mechanics.
  • Problem solving and mid-term exam
  • Work, energy and power.
  • Temperature and heat.
  • Introduction to thermodynamics.
  • Hydrostatics.
  • Problem solving.
  • Elasticity.
  • Problem solving
Teaching and learning methods: Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concepts of the fundamentals to students. The theories (equations) and their applications will be illustrated in this section.

Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student - instructor interactions. The instructor and students ask more questions and solve more examples.

Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will encourage you (students) to begin to gain confidence in solving difficult problems. The students are required to prepare any difficult problems they are unable to solve on their own for discussion.

Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students' answers to class-work and homework should be clear, concise and correct. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work.
Intended learning outcomes: Students are expected to develop the necessary skills required to solve fundamental problems in physics. This will enable them prepare for further studies in respective field.
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 25%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 10%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 (8th Ed.) Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol 1 (13th Ed.) Addison - Wesley
Code: GEN101
Lecturer: Rhema Friday Ekpah Oguche
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

NIL

Aims:

NIL

Syllabus:

NIL

Teaching and learning methods:

NIL

Intended learning outcomes:

NIL

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

NIL

Year 1 | Semester 2
Code: PHY108
Lecturer: Abdullahi Babangida Babaji
Unit: 1
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

General Physics 2 practical is the laboratory section that cover all the topics taught in General Physics 2 (PHY102).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of all the topics (Electricity, magnetism, vibration and waves)

Syllabus:

Electricity: Ohm’s law, heating effect of a current, internal resistance of a cell, meter/Wheatstone Bridge, potentiometer measurement of ece, plotting of magnetic field. Sound: resonance tube, sonometer.

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in PHY101 class.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: GEN108
Lecturer: Johnson Mercy
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: MTH102
Lecturer: Benjamin Oyediran Oyelami
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: PHY102
Lecturer: Muyideen Kolawole Salami,
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Physics 1 ,
Overview:

The subject of electromagnetism is a combination of electrostatics phenomena, magnetism, and current electricity. These must have seemed at one time to be entirely different phenomena until in 1829 when Oersted discovered that an electric current is surrounded by a magnetic field. The basic phenomena and the connections between these three disciplines were ultimately described by Maxwell towards the end of the nineteenth century in four famous equations called the Maxwell's Equations. The course acquaints the student with concepts of electric and magnetic fields associated with particles and how these are affected in the presence of other particles.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to aid students in understanding the broad-based fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism by emphasizing on applications associated to industrial processes and everyday experiences.

Syllabus:

Electrostatics.

Conductors and Currents.

Magnetism.

Maxwell's Equations.

Electromagnetic Waves and Oscillations.

Teaching and learning methods:

  • Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concept of the fundamentals to students.
  • Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student-instructor interactions.
  • Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will build confidence in students and encourage participation in problem solving.
  • Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students will received feedback on the homework and class-work for improvement.

Intended learning outcomes:

The theories and their applications illustrated in this module should expose students to the required foundational knowledge in Electromagnetism required for higher education in the department. 

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 20%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

  1. Young, H. D., & Freedman, R. A. (2015). University Physics with Modern Physics and Mastering Physics. Academic Imports Sweden AB.
  2. Serway, R. A., Beichner, R. J., & Jewett, J. W. (2000). Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics.
  3. Paul E. Tippens. (2007). Electricity and Magnetism Lecture Notes. Southern Polytechnic State University.
  4. Lisa Jardine-Wright. (2008). Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism. Cavendish Labrotory.

Code: GEN104
Lecturer: Abosede Omojuyigbe
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Use of English 1 ,
Overview:

In this module, students will learn to write well structured essays, overcome speech anxiety, work effectively in groups , the art of public speaking and give well structured presentations

Aims:

The aim of the module is to teach students the rudiments of public speaking, team work  and  presentations.

Syllabus:

Reading comprehension, Literary appreciation, Writing skills, Presentation skills, Working in groups for a presentation, Preparing for assessed presentation.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures will be given through power point presentations to explain the topics contained in the syllabus.
  • Class discussions will also be used to enhance individual participation, self confidence and team work as the students will be required to give presentations fortnightly


Intended learning outcomes:

Students who have taken this module should be able to:

  • Read effectively
  • Write well structured essays
  • Work effectively in a group or team
  • Carry out researches independently
  • Give good presentations


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Turner, Kathy et al., Essential Academic Skills,[ Oxford University Press,  Oxford ,2011]
  • Kathleen T. McWhorter,  Academic Reading,  [ HarperCollins College Publishers, 1994]
  • Seely, John, Oxford Guide to Effective Reading and Speaking, [ Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005]

Year 2 | Semester 1
Code: GEN201
Lecturer: Taofeek Adejare Owoseni
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Year 2 | Semester 2
Code: GEN202
Lecturer: Taofeek Adejare Owoseni
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship Studies I ,
Overview:

Entrepreneurship II expands on the foundation to this subject which was laid during the module Entrepreneurship I. We examine in detail the entrepreneurial process and Steps in the process of assessing the viability of a new venture which will be illustrated and students will be expected to conduct such a study.

Aims:

The aim of this module is the creation of New Ventures, that is, the ways and means they come into being and the key factors associated with either their success or failure.

Syllabus:

Decision to become an entrepreneur, Developing successful business ideas, Moving from an Idea to an Entrepreneurial firm, Managing and growing an Entrepreneurial firm.

Teaching and learning methods:

The module employs lectures, videos, case discussions and analyses, student field work & presentations and general discussions to engage the student in the material.  Student involvement in class activities play a significant role in the learning process. 

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module student should be able to:

  • Understand the nature of the entrepreneurial process and ways to manage the process
  • Understand the difference between an opportunity and an idea, how to recognize it and how to evaluate it.
  • Describe the purpose of a feasibility analysis and develop a business model
  • Appreciate ethical issues that are intertwined with entrepreneurial activities and develop a framework for managing ethical dilemmas. 
  • Evaluate the nature of creative new business concepts that can be turned into sustainable business ventures.
Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 15%
Quiz: %
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

Bruce R. Barringer and Duane Ireland. Entrepreneurship- Successfully Launching New Ventures, 5th Ed., Pearson

Code: GEN102
Lecturer: Aliyu Mamman
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Year 3 | Semester 1
Code: ECO408
Lecturer: Abbas Abdullahi Marafa
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

This course structure examines the debate on the concept of taxation, theories on taxation, effect of taxation, its implication, challenges and benefits as it relates to the Nigerian economic system.



Aims:

The aim of this course is to educate students on the systems of taxation.


Syllabus:

Taxation and taxation theories; taxation and tax incidence; welfare cost and negative income tax; Nigerian tax system; fiscal policy elements; fiscal federalism; debt and debt financing. The main issues in federal finance structure of public revenue. The structure of Public expenditure; inter – governmental transfers, regional /state revenues, Issues surrounding public debt; budgetary processes of governments.


Teaching and learning methods:

Lectures, Interactive group discussions, presentations and practical sessions are been used to explain the topics in the syllabus.



Intended learning outcomes:

On completion of this module, the student should be able to


  • Understand taxation and taxation theories and tax incidence.
  • Understand the concept of fiscal federalism, debt financing, and the main issues in federal finance structure.
  • Have a good knowledge of Issues surrounding public debt and budgetary processes of governments.



Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 10%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 10%
Recommended reading list:

Finance and Public Policy Jonathan Gruber Worth Publishers 2013 ISBN : 9781429278454

Year 3 | Semester 2
Year 4 | Semester 1
Year 4 | Semester 2
Code: GEN300
Lecturer: Esther T. Omonayin
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:

Entry requirements

Home / UTME


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
JAMB;

Home / Direct Entry


A level / Diploma / IJMB / HND / First degree;
JAMB DE Form;
SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

Home / Direct Transfer


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
Academic transcript;
Please note: Admission on transfer will only be issued after on campus interview;

Foundation


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

International (Nigerian)


O' level result;
JAMB;
Please note: You can get a conditional admission if you does not have JAMB, but you must provide it before you progress to 200 level;

International (Foreign)


O' level result;

Staff

S/N Staff Name Rank
1 MUSA ABDUL ABDULLAH Librarian/Lecturer II
2 AKUBUE ANSELM JIDEOFOR Senior Lecturer
3 EMMANUEL ACHUENU Professor
4 DAUDA SALIMAN Librarian/Lecturer II
5 ABBAS MUAZU Lecturer I
6 SAM M AYODELE Professor
7 AMINA LAWAL BATAGARAWA Senior Lecturer
8 ABDULRAZZAQ AHMAD MUHAMMAD-OUMAR Senior Lecturer
9 IKRAM BELLO SURU Corp member
10 HAUWA OLABISI YUSUF Librarian/Lecturer II
11 SALAM MOHAMMED ABDUL-ONE Librarian/Lecturer II
12 ABDULLAHI LAWAL MOHAMMED Lecturer ll
13 MUHAMMAD MAGAJI GARBA Professor
14 NGHAI EZEKIEL SULEMAN Professor
15 ABDULKADIR MOHAMMED 36