Baze University

Physics with Computing

About the course

\"Physics is an enabling discipline showing how to do things thought impossible and helping others refine their approach. Physics is to the rest of science what machine tools are to engineering.\"Sir John Pendry.

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\"Physics allows us to write with a piece of chalk on a blackboard the very structure of the universe and the shape of it. I mean... What\'s not to love?\" Dara O\'Briain.

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Physics studies how the universe works - from the smallest atomic nucleus to the largest galaxy. It includes conceptual challenges such as quantum theory, relativity and chaos theory, and lies at the heart of most modern technology - for example the computer, the laser and the Internet.

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The Department of Applied Science has the highest teaching standards and is recognized nationally as being one of the leading centres for research. Physics at Baze\'s obtained an excellent grade in the last subject-based Teaching Quality Assessment exercise, while in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise 50 per cent of the scientific research carried out by staff was internationally excellent or world-leading. All students are taught by the scientists whose work will be in the next generation of textbooks.

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This strong link between research and teaching in Physics at Baze\'s means our graduates obtain one of the best degrees available for understanding our recent scientific advances, and can play an important role in our increasingly technological society.

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The Department of Applied Science is committed to the development and application of effective theory based on realistic practice, and some of the modules were developed through consultation and collaboration with industry. The department believes that only by the interplay of theory and practice can you be trained properly in such a rapidly advancing subject. Practice alerts us to real contemporary problems - theory is a shield against professional obsolescence.

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You and other entrants to the course will come from a variety of backgrounds. If you are an experienced programmer in industry and commerce, you are motivated by the need for formal methods to overcome the problems of unreliable and inadequate software, or wish to extend your understanding by studying new programming and development paradigms in the field of physic.

You may be a recent graduate in computer science or physic and will supplement your knowledge with the kind of sound mathematical basis which is not always found in undergraduate courses.

If you are a graduate in mathematics, science or engineering, you will apply your training in the context of a rigorous application of the fundamental techniques of computer science.

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You will develop knowledge and understanding of a formal disciplined approach to physic and computer science, a range of relevant concepts, tools and techniques, the principles underpinning these techniques and the ability to apply them in novel situations.

On subsequent employment, you will be able to select techniques most appropriate to your working environment, adapt and improve them as necessary, establish appropriate design standards for both scientific hardware and software, train colleagues and subordinates in the observance of sound practices, and keep abreast of research and development.

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This strong link between research and teaching in Physics at Baze\'s means our graduates obtain one of the best degrees available for understanding our recent scientific advances, and can play an important role in our increasingly technological society.

What you will learn

The course aims:

to provide the foundation for a professional career in the science and/or computing-based industries, including telecommunications, process control, science lab, research institutions, etc;

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to enhance the skills of a professional who is already working in one of these industries;

to provide a foundation for research into the theory and practice of science and/or programming and the design of science computer-based systems;

to present knowledge, experience, reasoning methods and design and implementation techniques that are robust and forward-looking.

Graduate destinations

Information Systems Manager
IT Consultant
Nuclear Research Lab

Course Details

Course Structure
Year 1 | Semester 1
Code: GEN103
Lecturer: Mercy Johnson
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

This module will introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study.

Aims:

To introduce students to basic mathematical topics useful in their different courses of study at Baze University. Apart from learning the basic statistical tools useful for data collection, they will also gain valuable insight into number system, the concept of sets, laws of indices, solving equations and a wide range of other basic mathematical techniques. In essence, this module is designed to equip students with useful methods of solving and approaching mathematical problems.

Syllabus:

Introduction to Number System, Laws of Indices, General Inequality, Equation Systems, Algebra, Sequences and Series, Trigonometry as well as general overview of Statistics.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: Lectures will be used to introduce and explain major ideas and theories and to illustrate their wide-ranging applications. 
  • Interactive lectures will review materials by encouraging their active participation - inviting questions, working through examples, giving short quizzes, discussing case studies, or showing a  video followed by a quiz, etc.
  • Classes: This will encourage students to begin to apply the knowledge gained to real and hypothetical cases and will encourage them also to gain confidence in presenting and defending their own ideas. Classes will usually require them to read some material(s) for discussion, or prepare answers, give some presentations, research a topic, take part in a debate, etc. 
  • Homework: Homework will be assigned regularly. Regular assignments will help them understand the material and they will get feedback.

Intended learning outcomes:

On the  successful completion of this module, students are expected to have developed their skills and have:

  • Ability to read and understand fundamental mathematics.
  • Ability to apply range of concepts in Mathematics or represent and solve problems in Mathematics.
  • Ability to represent and analyse data using the right techniques.


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Basic College Mathematics by Elayn Matin-Gay, New Jersey, Pearson Prentice Hall.
  • College Mathematics for Business, Economics, Life Sciences & Social Sciences (11th Edition) by Raymond A. Bernet, Michael R, Ziegler, & Karl E. Byleen. New Jersey, Pearson Prence Hall.
  • Algebra & Trigonometry (Sixth Edition) by Michael Sullivan. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458.
  • Any other mathematical textbook that covers any of the topics.

Code: CHM101
Lecturer: Jibrin Noah Akoji
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
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Code: PHY107
Lecturer: Babangida Babaji Abdullahi
Unit: 1
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

General Physics 1 practical is the laboratory section that cover all the topics taught in General Physics 1 (PHY101).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of all the topics (mechanics, heat and optics)

Syllabus:

The experiments include: Mechanics: timing experiments, simple pendulum, compound pendulum, measurement of g, moments, determination of moment of inertia, measurement of viscosity, use of force board, law of momentum. Optics: reflection using plane mirror, convex/concave mirror, concave/convex lens, refraction using a prism, critical angle, apparent depth/real depth, simple microscope, compound microscope.Heat: measurement of specific heat capacity of water and a solid, expansion of gas experiment using a long capillary tube, Joule’s law.

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in PHY101 class.Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: COM112
Lecturer: Mrs Lawrence Morolake Oladayo
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: NIL
Aims: NIL
Syllabus: NIL
Teaching and learning methods: NIL
Intended learning outcomes: NIL
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list: NIL
Code: GEN107
Lecturer: James Daniel
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
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Assessment:
Exams: %
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Quiz: %
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Recommended reading list:
Code: MTH103
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
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Code: PHY101
Lecturer: Hamman Gabdo
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: General overview of the module, module description and students - instructor introduction.
Aims: To aid students to understand the broad-based fundamental principles of the physical world. This module will on the practical applications of everyday experience and industrial processes. 
Syllabus:
  • Measurement in physical world
  • One dimensional kinematics - distance, displacement, speed, velocity, acceleration, uniform, motion, free fall.
  • Vector and scalar - vector addition, subtraction, division, multiplication and applications.
  • Problem solving section.
  • Two-dimensional kinematics - position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and projectile.
  • Fundamental laws of Mechanics.
  • Problem solving and mid-term exam
  • Work, energy and power.
  • Temperature and heat.
  • Introduction to thermodynamics.
  • Hydrostatics.
  • Problem solving.
  • Elasticity.
  • Problem solving
Teaching and learning methods: Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concepts of the fundamentals to students. The theories (equations) and their applications will be illustrated in this section.

Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student - instructor interactions. The instructor and students ask more questions and solve more examples.

Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will encourage you (students) to begin to gain confidence in solving difficult problems. The students are required to prepare any difficult problems they are unable to solve on their own for discussion.

Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students' answers to class-work and homework should be clear, concise and correct. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work.
Intended learning outcomes: Students are expected to develop the necessary skills required to solve fundamental problems in physics. This will enable them prepare for further studies in respective field.
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 25%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 10%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 (8th Ed.) Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol 1 (13th Ed.) Addison - Wesley
Code: GEN101
Lecturer: Andrew Bula
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

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Aims:

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Syllabus:

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Teaching and learning methods:

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Intended learning outcomes:

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Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

NIL

Year 1 | Semester 2
Code: CHM102
Lecturer: Abubakar Alkali
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview: NIL
Aims: NIL
Syllabus: NIL
Teaching and learning methods: NIL
Intended learning outcomes: NIL
Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list: NIL
Code: PHY108
Lecturer: Babangida Babaji Abdullahi
Unit: 1
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

General Physics 2 practical is the laboratory section that cover all the topics taught in General Physics 2 (PHY102).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of all the topics (Electricity, magnetism, vibration and waves)

Syllabus:

Electricity: Ohm’s law, heating effect of a current, internal resistance of a cell, meter/Wheatstone Bridge, potentiometer measurement of ece, plotting of magnetic field. Sound: resonance tube, sonometer.

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in PHY101 class.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
  • University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: GEN108
Lecturer: Mercy Johnson
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
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Code: COM102
Lecturer: Chandrasekhar Uppin
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

The purpose of this module is to provide students with a coherent knowledge of problem solving techniques and tools for designing defined and undefined problem structure. Practicing with the various kinds of problems by applying appropriate logic, strategies and suitable techniques to find computational/logical problems solutions in academic environment. 

Aims:

Aim to introduce this module to build the problem solving skills with creativity, self-analysis ability  and smakes the students a better problem solver in general irrespective of their stream of study. designed this course in hopes of 

  • Creative, Self-understanding ability 
  • Ability to design and plan for desired solutions  
  • Build the analytical skill and cogent abilities
  • Understand how student operates as individual problem solver in academic and personal. 
  • Recognize limitations and pitfalls.
  • Learn the various techniques that can apply to solve problems.

Eventually, Improve ability of successful problem solver in the life.  


Syllabus:

Introduction to problem solving, problem solving strategies, problem reduction strategies, problem Solving process stages, various kinds of problems and examples. Defined and undefined problem structure, Instructions and operators involved in problem solving process, distinguish between exercises solving and problem solving. Characteristics of good and successful problem solvers. Mental blocks and overcome strategies with good practices. Problem solving techniques and tools (Algorithms and Flow-Charts), Selection (decision) and Iteration constructs. Analogies and Logic and invariant type of problems with examples.         

Teaching and learning methods:

  • In learning Process incorporate various kinds of problems to solve regularly in the classroom so students become comfortable with it.
  • Teach problem solving process, steps and strategies.
  • Use real-life situation with data and integrate other content areas into the problems as much as possible.
  • In Interactive lectures ample use  of word problems, charts, tables algorithms, flowcharts to introduce units of study and practices not just at the end.
  • Understanding and practices of problem solving process stages using structured problem solving with various techniques. (Algorithms and Flowcharts are practiced). 
  • In Workshops proving ample hands on work (Individual/Group) and assignments will be practiced regularly to test student creativity and memory managing abilities. 


Intended learning outcomes:

On the successful completion of this module the student should understand and be able to:-

  • Understand the areas need to be improving within.
  • Learn about self and work towards improving self-management.
  • Developing creative, innovative practical solutions
  • Learn problem-solving techniques using appropriate tools. Applying a range of strategies to problem solving
  • Solve a wide variety of problems, so as to learn how to apply the techniques
  • Understand distinguish between Exercise solving and Problem solving.
  • Identify skills and personality traits of successful problem solvers. Applying problem solving strategies across a range of areas.


Assessment:
Exams: 70%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 10%
Recommended reading list:

Gough, J. (1998). Devil's Advocacy as Critical Research Methodology: Spatial Thinking as a Case Study, "Sixth Contemporary Approaches to Research in Mathematics, Science, Health and Environmental Education", pp. 1-25, Melbourne. 

1st Edition: Crebert, G., Patrick, C.-J., & Cragnolini, V. (2004). 

2nd Edition: Crebert, G., Patrick, C.-J., Cragnolini, V., Smith, C., Worsfold, K., & Webb, F. (2011). Problem Solving Skills Toolkit. (Retrieved from the World Wide Web 4th April, 2011) http://www.griffith.edu.au/gihe/resources-support/graduate-attributes

Computer Science Vol-I by. C V Uppin  and Class Hand Outs (PPTs)

Web resources :

  • Indiana University - Kirkley, J. (n.d.). Principles for Teaching Problem Solving. (Retrieved from the World Wide Web on 1 September, 2004) http://www.plato.com/downloads/papers/paper_04.pdf 
  • University of New England - Malouff, J. (2010). Fifty Problem Solving Strategies Explained. (Retrieved from the World Wide Web on 22 December, 2010) http://www.une.edu.au/bcss/psychology/john-malouff/problem-solving.php 
  • Virtual Salt – Harris, R. (2002). Problem Solving Techniques. (Retrieved from the World Wide Web on 22 December, 2010) http://www.virtualsalt.com/crebook4.htm 
  • University of Delaware. (n.d.). Problem-based Learning.(Retrieved from the World Wide Web on 22 December, 2010) http://www.udel.edu/pbl/ .


Code: MTH102
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: MTH103
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: PHY102
Lecturer: Joseph Asare
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Physics 1 ,
Overview:

The subject of electromagnetism is a combination of electrostatics phenomena, magnetism, and current electricity. These must have seemed at one time to be entirely different phenomena until in 1829 when Oersted discovered that an electric current is surrounded by a magnetic field. The basic phenomena and the connections between these three disciplines were ultimately described by Maxwell towards the end of the nineteenth century in four famous equations called the Maxwell's Equations. The course acquaints the student with concepts of electric and magnetic fields associated with particles and how these are affected in the presence of other particles.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to aid students in understanding the broad-based fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism by emphasizing on applications associated to industrial processes and everyday experiences.

Syllabus:

Electrostatics.

Conductors and Currents.

Magnetism.

Maxwell's Equations.

Electromagnetic Waves and Oscillations.

Teaching and learning methods:

  • Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concept of the fundamentals to students.
  • Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student-instructor interactions.
  • Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will build confidence in students and encourage participation in problem solving.
  • Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students will received feedback on the homework and class-work for improvement.

Intended learning outcomes:

The theories and their applications illustrated in this module should expose students to the required foundational knowledge in Electromagnetism required for higher education in the department. 

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 20%
Quiz: 5%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

  1. Young, H. D., & Freedman, R. A. (2015). University Physics with Modern Physics and Mastering Physics. Academic Imports Sweden AB.
  2. Serway, R. A., Beichner, R. J., & Jewett, J. W. (2000). Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics.
  3. Paul E. Tippens. (2007). Electricity and Magnetism Lecture Notes. Southern Polytechnic State University.
  4. Lisa Jardine-Wright. (2008). Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism. Cavendish Labrotory.

Code: GEN104
Lecturer: Omojuyigbe Abosede
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: Use of English 1 ,
Overview:

In this module, students will learn to write well structured essays, overcome speech anxiety, work effectively in groups , the art of public speaking and give well structured presentations

Aims:

The aim of the module is to teach students the rudiments of public speaking, team work  and  presentations.

Syllabus:

Reading comprehension, Literary appreciation, Writing skills, Presentation skills, Working in groups for a presentation, Preparing for assessed presentation.

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures will be given through power point presentations to explain the topics contained in the syllabus.
  • Class discussions will also be used to enhance individual participation, self confidence and team work as the students will be required to give presentations fortnightly


Intended learning outcomes:

Students who have taken this module should be able to:

  • Read effectively
  • Write well structured essays
  • Work effectively in a group or team
  • Carry out researches independently
  • Give good presentations


Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:
  • Turner, Kathy et al., Essential Academic Skills,[ Oxford University Press,  Oxford ,2011]
  • Kathleen T. McWhorter,  Academic Reading,  [ HarperCollins College Publishers, 1994]
  • Seely, John, Oxford Guide to Effective Reading and Speaking, [ Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005]

Year 2 | Semester 1
Code: PHY201
Lecturer: Salami Muyideen Kolawole
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: General Physics 1 (Practical) ,
Overview:

The failure of the classical mechanics in explaining wave-particle duality, black body radiation, photoelectric effect and the motion of high velocity objects approaching the speed of light led to modern physics (Special relativity and Quantum mechanics). Special relativity describes the motion of object whose velocity is approaching the speed of light while Quantum mechanics describe the motion and interaction of very small particles. The course acquaints the student with concepts and application of Special relativity and Quantum physics in industrial processes and everyday life.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to aid students in understanding the theories and basic concepts of Special relativity and the failures of Newtonian mechanics, hence, the need for Quantum mechanics to understand particles behavior.

Syllabus:

Special Relativity. Experimental Basis of Quantum Theory. Wave-Particle Duality, Probability and Uncertainty. Atomic Model. Energy Level. Schrodinger Wave Equation

Teaching and learning methods:
  • Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concepts of the fundamentals to students.
  • Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student-instructor interactions.
  • Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will build confidence in students and encourage participation in problem solving.
  • The theories and their applications illustrated in this module should expose students to the required foundational knowledge in special relativity and modern physics required for higher education in the department.Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work for improvement.

Intended learning outcomes:

The theories and their applications illustrated in this module should expose students to the required foundational knowledge in special relativity and modern physics required for higher education in the department.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

1. Young, H. D., & Freedman, R. A. (2015). University Physics with Modern Physics and Mastering Physics. Academic Imports Sweden AB.


2. Serway, R. A., Beichner, R. J., & Jewett, J. W. (2000). Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics


3. Frederick and Eugene (1997): Schaum’s Outlines of College Physics. McGraw-Hill companies, Inc., United States.


4. David Mcmahon (2006): Quantum Mechanics Demystified. McGraw-Hill companies, Inc., United States.

Code: GEN201
Lecturer: Shulammite Paul
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: PHY209
Lecturer: Oyewole Oluwaseun
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: General Physics 1 (Practical) , General Physics 2 (Practical) ,
Overview:

This module investigates the energy from its source in the core of the Sun to its impacts in the Earth’s magnetosphere and Earth atmosphere. The emphasis is mainly on ionization and space plasmas, and electrical and/or magnetic physical phenomena, including lightning and transient luminous events. It also covers things on atmospheric science. This module basically strives to understand the origin of the universe and its future life including concepts on space craft engineering and planetary systems.

Aims:

The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of the basics of nature and to acquire proper techniques for solving problems related to the Universe.

Syllabus:

Introduction to Astronomy and Astrophysics.Satellite communication and Introduction to Atmospheric Science.Space environment, Space craft system and dynamics.Aero/ Astrodynamics engineering and Rocket engineering.Cosmology.Origin of the universe and life.Space law and business development.

Teaching and learning methods:

• Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concepts of the fundamentals to students.
• Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student-instructor interactions.
• Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will build confidence in students and encourage participation in problem solving.
• Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work for improvement.

Intended learning outcomes:

Students will become familiar with the:
• formulation of the Universe,
• origin and evolution of the solar and planetary  systems,
• rules thatgovern the Universe,
• history of the universe, and
• the futuristic outcome of the Universe.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

1. https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/seuforum/
2. Sears and Zemansky’s University Physics with Modern Physics” by Young and Freedman, 13th edition, Chapters 44
3. David Halliday, Robert Resnickand Jearl Walker, Fundamentals of Physics, 8th edition, USA John Wiley & Sons, 2008, Chapter 44

Code: MTH201
Lecturer: Mmaduabuchi Okpala
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: PHY207
Lecturer: Shehu, Muhammad Shafi'u
Unit: 2
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:

This is a purely experimental module that consists of a group of experiments drawn from diverse area of Physics (Optics,Electromagnetism Mechanics, Modern Physics etc).

Aims:

The aim of this module is to assist students with the practical of optics and electromagnetism

Syllabus:

Experiments on determination of moment of inertia of a bar using a bifilar suspension, determination of the moment of inertia of flywheel, principles of moment, principles of kinematics, spiral spring, determination of the acceleration of gravity by means of a compound pendulum, coefficient of static and dynamic friction for wood, determination of the refractive index of a prism, determination of the focal length of an inaccessible converging lens by Newton’s method, determination of the focal length of a converging lens by location of virtual images, determination of the focal length of a converging lens by the self-conjugate method.
Determination of the focal length of a diverging lens using a concave mirror and a converging lens, determination of the focal length of a converging lens by displacement method, determination of the focal length of a convex mirror using a plane mirror and a converging mirror calibration of a voltmeter using a potentiometer circuit,

Teaching and learning methods:

This module is a purely experimental. Each experiment will be accompanied with laboratory manual. Students will be taken through the lab sections by Technologists and the module instructors. The students will then submit their laboratory reports for assessment.

Intended learning outcomes:

At the end of the module, students will be equipped with report writing skill. They will also understand the practical of what have been discussed in class.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

• Fundamentals of Physics by David Halliday, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, Vol. 1 8th Ed. Wiley (2007)
• University Physics by Young Freedman, vol. 1 13th Ed. Addison-Wesley

Code: COM201
Lecturer: Mubaraka Sani Ibrahim
Unit: 15
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:
Code: PHY205
Lecturer: Joseph Asare
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: General Physics 1 (Practical) ,
Overview:

Students will be told of their expectations from instructor, while the rules and regulations will be highlighted.

Aims:

To introduce the basic theorems and laws of thermodynamics to students in a way that will allow them to solve thermodynamic -related problems

Syllabus:

• Introduction-Temperature and Heat
• Foundations of classical thermodynamics including the zeroth
• The first law, work heat and internal energy
• Carnot cycles and the second law
• Entropy and irreversibility
• Thermodynamic potentials and the Maxwell relations
• Qualitative discussion of phase transitions
• Third law of thermodynamics
• Ideal and real gases
• Elementary kinetic theory of gases including Boltzmanconstant
• Maxwell-Boltzman Law of distribution of velocities, simple applications of the distribution law.

Teaching and learning methods:

• Lectures: This will be used to introduce the module and explain major concepts of the fundamentals to students. The theories (equations) and their applications will be illustrated in this section.
• Interactive Lectures: This section of the teaching will allow active student-instructor interactions. The Instructor and students ask more questions and solve more examples.
• Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will encourage you (students) to begin to gain confidence in solving difficult problems. The students are required to prepare any difficult problems they are unable to solve on their own for discussion.
• Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students’ answers to class-work and homework should be clear, concise and correct. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work.

Intended learning outcomes:

After this module, students will be able to thermodynamic-related problems using laws and theorems.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

• Charles Kittel and Herbert Kromer (1980), “Thermal Physics”, 2nd edition, Freeman publisher, 496p Schroeder D.V. (2000): An Introduction to Thermal Physics, Addison-Wesley-Longman, 2000
• Frederick J. Bueche and H. Eugene, B. (2009), Schaum’s outline of theory and problems of college Physics (9th edition), Schaums, pp. 171-209
• Reif F (1965), Fundamentals of statistical and Thermal Physics, McGraw Hill Publishing
• Sears and Zemansky’s, University Physics with Modern Physics 13th edition, pp. 551-652
• U tube and other internet resources

Year 2 | Semester 2
Code: PHY202
Lecturer: Shehu, Muhammad Shafi'u
Unit: 3
Prerequisite: General Physics 1 (Practical) , General Physics 2 (Practical) ,
Overview:

Students will be told of their expectations from instructor, while the rules and regulations will be highlighted.

Aims:

To aid students to understand the fundamentals of circuit analysis techniques. The emphasis in this module will be on the practical application to everyday experiences and industrial processes.

Syllabus:

• General overview of the module, module description and students -instructor introduction.
• Current, resistor, voltage and Ohm’s law. Source emf and current, practical
• Connection of resistors in circuits- Series and parallel connection of resistors and emf sources. Practical
• Kirchoff’s law – Kirchoff Current Law (KCL) and Kirchoff Voltage Law (KVL)
• Applications of Kirchhoff’s law in circuit. Practical
• D.C – network analysis and circuit theorems (Thevennin and Norton)
• Network analysis – Superposition and maximum power transfer theorems. Practical
• Inductance, capacitance and transformer. Practical
• D.C. sinusoidal waveform run and peak values, power, impedance and admittance series.
• Series R-L, R-C and RLC circuits. Practical
• A.C – network analysis and circuit theorems
• Semiconductors, p-n junction
• Field effect transistor and bipolar transistor
• Characteristics and equivalent circuits, amplifiers, feedback and oscillators

Teaching and learning methods:

• Lectures: The concepts of the fundamentals are described to students.
• Interactive Lectures: There will be active student-instructor interactions.
• Classes/Tutorials: Tutorial sections will encourage you (students) to begin to gain confidence in solving difficult problems.
• Class-work/Homework: Class-work and Homework will be assigned regularly. Students’ answers to class-work and homework should be clear, concise and correct. Students will receive feedback on the homework and class-work.
• Practical: Students will be taken through hands-on experiments that are related to the theories learnt in class.

Intended learning outcomes:

Students are expected to be able to design simple circuits and analysis complex circuits using different types of methods and theorems.

Assessment:
Exams: 60%
Test: 15%
Quiz: 10%
Coursework: 15%
Recommended reading list:

• Fundamental of Electric Circuits, 2012 by Charles Alexander and Matthew Sadiku.
• Introductory Circuit Analysis, 13th Edition, 2015, by Robert L. Boylestad.
• Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, 2005 (8th Edition) by David Irwin and Mark Nelms.
• Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices and Applications, 8th Edition, 2009, by Thomas L. Floyd and David M. Buchla.

Year 3 | Semester 2
Code: GEN301
Lecturer: Obianuju Chidiebele Aliche
Unit: 0
Prerequisite: No Prerequisite
Overview:
Aims:
Syllabus:
Teaching and learning methods:
Intended learning outcomes:
Assessment:
Exams: %
Test: %
Quiz: %
Coursework: %
Recommended reading list:

Entry requirements

Home / UTME


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
JAMB;

Home / Direct Entry


A level / Diploma / IJMB / HND / First degree;
JAMB DE Form;
SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

Home / Direct Transfer


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);
Academic transcript;
Please note: Admission on transfer will only be issued after on campus interview;

Foundation


SSCE (WAEC, NECO, etc);

International (Nigerian)


O' level result;
JAMB;
Please note: You can get a conditional admission if you does not have JAMB, but you must provide it before you progress to 200 level;

International (Foreign)


O' level result;

Staff

S/N Staff Name Rank
1 JOSEPH ASARE Lecturer II
2 KAZEEM SALAKO Senior Lecturer
3 OYEWOLE OLUWASEUN Lecturer I
4 SALAMI MUYIDEEN KOLAWOLE Assistant Lecturer
5 SHEHU, MUHAMMAD SHAFI'U Graduate Assistant